Sandhill Crane chick approx. a month after hatching. Come on over and check the little guy out @ Crandon Gardens.

Sandhill Crane chick approx. a month after hatching. Come on over and check the little guy out @ Crandon Gardens.

Sandhill Cranes mate for life, choosing their partners based on dancing displays. Displaying birds stretch their wings, pump their heads, bow, and leap into the air. Although each female usually lays two eggs, only one nestling typically survives to fledge. Mated pairs and their juvenile offspring stay together all through the winter, until the 9- to 10-month-old juveniles finally separate from their parents the following spring. During migration and winter the family units group together with other families and nonbreeders, forming loose roosting and feeding flocks—in some places numbering in the tens of thousands. Eggs, nestlings, and injured or sick adults may be hunted by foxes, raccoons, coyotes, wolves, bobcats, crows, ravens, eagles, and owls. Cranes attack aerial predators by leaping into the air and kicking their feet forward. They threaten terrestrial predators by spreading their wings and hissing, eventually resorting to kicking.

 

Learn the importance of keeping beaches natural.
Thanks to Audubon Society for providing the valuable resource.

Linda Lentin K-8 Center

Linda Lentin K-8 Center

In honor of the rapidly approaching onset of the sea turtle nesting season, one of our senior naturalist and Sea Turtle Ranger, Argelio Chaviano, teaches the kids at Linda Lentin K-8 Center about these fascinating creatures.  These outreach programs are being conducted at various title 1 schools, contact us to book your own outreach programs.

Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis)

Sandhill Cranes
(Grus canadensis)

Looks like our resident Sandhill Cranes have made themselves a fine nest on a small island inside of Crandon Gardens.  Typically gestation time for this species is about 29-32 days. We might get a chance to see some babies! Wish them luck!

IMG_20140228_094831_766

Beach Jaquemontia (Jaquemontia reclinata)

 

Jacquemontia reclinata is a member of the morning glory family (Convolvulaceae) that is restricted to the southeastern coast of Florida. Much of the primary habitat of this species, beach coastal strand and maritime hammock, has been destroyed or altered for residential and commercial construction. Fewer than 1,000 individual plants exist, placing this species under the category of endangered. They are found in small, widely separated populations in Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, where habitat loss and modification place this species at a high risk of extinction. Habitat conservation and management and reintroduction efforts are needed to ensure the survival of this species.

B AHERN & Capt James Baker The FinwayBill Ahern, Miami-Dade’s Lead Sea Turtle Ranger and Capt. James Baker of the Finway, stand alongside 34 pounds of fishing line collected at Pelican Harbor Marina through Miami Dade’s Fishing Line Recycling program.  The collective total for Haulover, Bill Bird & Pelican Harbor Marinas totals to approx. 217 lbs since the start of the program.  The program started up in 2005 through a grant provided by University of Florida’s Sea Grants Program and continues through  the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmostpheric Sciences.The collection bins that can be found at most Miami Dade Marinas and Fishing Sites were installed by a local group of Eagle Scouts.  Thanks go out to everyone who assisted this effort: The Kelley Fleet, New Moon, Finway, Free Spool, The Therapy, The Spellbound & all the dock Hands & community fisher folks for helping keep this threat to our marine life out of our waters and coastal communities.

That's a lot of line!

That’s a lot of line!

 

 

 

It was a beautiful, sunny day on Biscayne Bay this Saturday morning. We were accompanied on the still bay waters by a group of dads and daughters from the Carrollton School of the Sacred Heart. Here are some shots of the trip;

Even boarding the boats can be fun!

Even boarding the boats can be fun!

The flotilla heads out on the bay!

The flotilla heads out on the bay!

Family fun time!

Family fun time!

The Mangrove Upside-down Jellyfish ( Casseopia xamachanna) commonly found in the bay waters.  These unique jellyfish lie on their backs in shallow, clear water.  They harbor endosymbiotic algae (much like corals); the algae photosynthesize and pass extra sugars on to the jellyfish.

The Mangrove Upside-down Jellyfish ( Casseopia xamachanna) commonly found in the bay waters. These unique jellyfish lie on their backs in shallow, clear water.

Entering Mosquito Creek

Entering Mosquito Creek

Inside the fringing mangrove forests we found Thorny Sea Stars (Echinaster spinulosus)

Inside the fringing mangrove forests we found Thorny Sea Stars
(Echinaster spinulosus)

The Brown Pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) look down on the group  as the group heads back to the marina.

The Brown Pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis)
provide overwatch as the group heads back to the marina, another great day on the water complete.

Check us out @ http://www.miamiecoadventures.com and reserve your own adventure!

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